Lookbook 12

Blogger Approved: A Good Getaway

First and foremost I owe all of you an apology. Whether your a regular reader of my Tuesdays and Thursdays posts or you’re new to my page (welcome), I think it was extremely rude of me to leave all of you hanging and wondering where I’ve been.

First and foremost I owe all of you an apology. Whether your a regular reader of my Tuesdays and Thursdays posts or you’re new to my page (welcome), I think it was extremely rude of me to leave all of you hanging and wondering where I’ve been. I’ve been going through a lot of inner-self battles and finding the strength to overcome them. Not to mention, I rather give my thought process more time to give all of you a worthy post to read rather than rushing my ideas onto a blank page the morning it’s “due”.

Solitude is the soul’s holiday, an opportunity to stop doing for others and to surprise and delight ourselves instead. When we are hungry, we get the signal right away, and we pay attention. Thirst is sneakier. By the time our bodies send us in search of water, we are already dehydrated. The same holds true in our thirst for solitude. By the time I begin to crave a vacation alone on a desert island, chances are my emotional well has already run dry. And so I’ve learned to create little islands of solitude in my daily life. Which I feel is important because your mental health is just as, if not more, important than any other health issue. If you’re not completely well mentally, how are you suppose to give a helping hand to a friend, family member, or stranger? It’s like drinking water from an empty cup.

I’ve realized that we avoid ourselves because we’re afraid of what we might find: a forlorn, flawed someone who’s missing out on life’s party. But solitude and isolation do not go hand in hand. We can retreat from the world for a time without being renounced by it. Because if you’re never alone, how do you truly find yourself? How are you expected to love and confine in someone else if you can’t love and confine in yourself?

I know it may sound weird or even feel uncomfortable at first, but go out alone. When I say go out alone I mean completely and solely alone – no phone, computer, or civilization. And if that’s hard for you to do at first, take a your boyfriend or closest friend. Talk about things you wouldn’t normally talk about. Sit on the edge of the cliff, run your toes through the cold water until your skin adapts to the temperature, lay in the grass and take note of all the trees while inhaling and exhaling genuine fresh air. Alone—in moments of prayer or meditation, or simply in stillness—we breathe more deeply, see more fully, hear more keenly. We notice more, and in the process, we return to what is sacred. Until next time…

xoxo, B.

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Photographer – Austin Schulz

Stylist – Paige Amdahl 

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